BC Dres

The Dres family conjures up the sweaty aesthetics of sportswear and will find fans among those who like large-screen TVs, potato chips, and can’t seem to be drawn away from live feeds of team sports. It’s mandatory for those who own a club card to the local stadium or sports hall, prefer to drink beer from a paper cup, eat cold hot dogs and carry fireworks in their pockets. And of course for those who know all of the chants and choruses of their club by heart, wear scarves with logos around their necks and only travel by public transport dressed in the attire of their favourite club. No matter if it’s a football, ice hockey, volleyball or basketball club, regardless of whether you support Liverpool or United, Jágr, Gretzky or Maradona. Dres will remind you of all the successes (or failures) of your national or favourite team; some will also be reminded of the legendary Mexico 68 typography.
The Dres typeface was a part of a school project given to students at the Type Design and Typography studio of the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague. The task was to design numbers for sport dresses. Vojta first drew the numbers, and a year later created letters and eight more styles with specific instroke decorations as an addition to the numbering system.


A typeface for sports shirts needs to be simple, large, bold, and most of all, legible. It needs to be seen from a distance so that you can’t mistake the tiny figures on the pitch. Ornaments don’t belong on a sports shirt, and neither do attempts at original shape creations. Only decent linear decor is allowed, everything else is a distraction. Vojtěch Říha wasn’t content with just one universal type; instead, he made an extensive group of styles that can be combined at will. A total of eleven typefaces within the framework of a simple geometric construction are available, which you’ll be able to combine into an unbeatable football (or typography) team. On hand are styles as rounded as sausages, boxy styles, full and linear styles, even several fonts with different levels of blotchiness. Some evoke sports fields, others evoke lines in front of a football goal, but all have an identical character set and contain excellent diacritics, as well as special symbols including arrows and fractions to support your creativity.

 

 

A typeface for sports shirts needs to be simple, large, bold, and most of all, legible. It needs to be seen from a distance so that you can’t mistake the tiny figures on the pitch.

 

BC Dres 2

 

The Dres typeface was a part of a school project given to students at the Type Design and Typography studio. The task was to design numbers for sport dresses. Vojta first drew the numbers, and a year later created letters and eight more styles. The first poster for Dres font; 2012.

 

Design: Vojtěch Říha
Number of fonts in a family: 11 (One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten, Eleven)
Number of glyphs per font: 386
Release date: 2014

 

OpenType Features:
Slashed Zero (zero)
Localized Forms (locl)